Preparing Young Adults for their Financial Future

With back-to-school right around the corner, we wanted to use this blog to address preparing young adults for their financial future. particularly those between the ages of 15-24. While some of these topics are especially important for young people, many are relevant for all ages.

Budgeting

There is a common misconception that “budgeting” is restrictive – that one must eliminate life’s pleasures – trading a night out with friends for a single serving of Cup Noodles ramen at home. Not so.

Rather, having a budget simply means that you’re thinking about money decisions before making them. The idea is to become more intentional with your spending so that you’re not forced to stay home, alone, eating Cup Noodles simply due to short-sighted planning.

So, in the same way that a recent college entrant has to learn about balancing their classes, homework, study hours, extracurriculars, and social life, they also need to learn how to prioritize their financial wants vs. needs.

Not having experience managing month-to-month living expenses is no excuse for unconsciously blowing through funds – whether their own funds, loaned funds, or the supplemental money provided by the bank of mom & dad.

Budget Practice for Young People

One way for our children to manage their wants vs. needs as it relates to finances is to give them a sense of agency and personal responsibility in how funds are spent.

High Schoolers

When it comes to back-to-school shopping, consider giving your high schooler a budget to spend on new clothes, shoes, backpacks, and other discretionary items they may need. If you’re feeling generous you can even let them know that whatever they don’t spend, they can keep.

“Want those new Jordan’s? Have at it! But don’t complain when you’re remaining funds only afford you a pair of shorts and a t-shirt!”

Those $60 Vans almost immediately begin looking more appealing.

College-aged Kids

For parents providing their college-aged kids with supplemental funds, consider setting parameters around monthly living expenses.

Always re-funding their checking account and/or paying off the credit card bill in full each month is unlikely to instill personal responsibility as it relates to finances.

Instead, consider setting a monthly amount that you’ll contribute to their debit account. If you’re child exceeds that and there’s still five days left in the month they’ll either learn to love those Cup Noodles or they’ll adapt… or they’ll get frustrated and tell you you’re a bad parent.

In any case – they’re learning through living.

Big Ticket Expenses

Inevitably, there will be cases when your child asks for your support for bigger ticket expenses.

Examples: a spring break trip, studying abroad, or purchasing a car.

Does your child need to fund any one of these fully through their summer job, work-study, or internship? As parents, that’s your call. It’s likely that many parents reading this either self-funded these things or skipped out on them because both parental support and personal funds were lacking.

However, for parents that are lending financial support to children, getting your child to contribute towards the larger goal – perhaps a defined percentage or an agreed upon amount – is a great way for them to have skin in the game.

Developing a Good Credit History

Building good credit history is an important task. In an increasingly cashless society, creating a track record that shows you are a reliable borrower is a major step in the right direction towards financial independence. The sooner one begins, the better.

Secured Credit Cards

Getting a credit card can be a challenge for those without a credit history. This is where secured credit cards come in. Children over the age of 18 can qualify, regardless of income.

REASON: A secured credit card requires putting down a security deposit (think: collateral) that acts as the card’s credit limit. It’s kind of like your little one riding with training wheels again… but it builds their credit history.

We found Bankrate’s list of secured credit cards helpful to sort through the variety of options.

Do note that secured credit cards are not the only way for a young person to get access to a card that builds their credit history – they can also be added as an authorized user on a family member’s credit card.

Establishing good credit at a young age can open up opportunities down the road and credit scores can impact all of the following:

  •  Leasing an apartment
  • Setting up utilities
  • Applying for a job
  • Buying or leasing a car
  • Purchasing a cell phone plan
  • Interest rates for credit cards and various loans

Additionally – there are some basic rules of thumb to ensure that credit is being used appropriately and improving a new borrower’s credit score:

  • Set up automatic payments (to ensure no missed payments)
  • Keep credit utilization below 30% credit utilization (i.e. staying below 30% of total credit limit)
  • Pay off your balances in full when due (i.e. not paying off immediately after each transaction)
  • Make student loan payments on time

DID YOU KNOW: Your three free credit reports can be accessed directly from annualcreditreport.com – the only source for free credit reports as authorized by Federal law.

Other important financial know-hows for young adults:

Knowing How a Bank Account Works

Do they understand:

  • minimum balance requirements?
  • overdraft and service fees and how to avoid them?
  • how long it can take to transfer funds between different accounts and institutions?

Being Smart About Cybersecurity

Many students use shared Wi-Fi networks that are not secure – are they aware of this?
Consider investing in a Virtual Private Network (VPN) to establish a secure, encrypted connection between your child’s computer and the internet.

Renting Textbooks

No need to buy new if you can rent or buy used.

Student Loans & Delayed Gratification

For those that take out student loans, it’s not uncommon to have some extra funds available after tuition/room/board fees are paid.

No – these funds are not fun money. Student loan borrowers should be reminded that the longer these surplus loan funds can be stretched, the less they’ll need to fork over for monthly repayment when they begin working.

Long-term Investing

Children with on-the-books earned income are also likely to be in a low (or zero %) tax bracket. This presents a great opportunity to open and fund the golden egg of their future financial plan: a Roth IRA.

Final Thoughts:

Discussing household finances is, unfortunately, a taboo subject in many families. However, the more proactive we can be in preparing young adults for their financial future the better we can equip them with information to help them avoid common pitfalls and succeed.

So – please – think about those young adults (or soon-to-be young adults) in your life and share what you can. Each of us stands on the shoulders of those before us. Even if you don’t feel that your lived experience is worth sharing, it’s highly likely that a young person could glean gems of wisdom from both your financial successes and your defeats.

Parents: Also be aware of recent FAFSA updates and the pros and cons of cosigning a student loan.

CLIENTS: We are offering an on-demand financial literacy course that your children have access to for FREE. This is not only a great educational opportunity for them, but also something they can leverage on their resume or school application.

Please be in touch if this might be of interest.

This One Change to Financial Aid Could Negatively Impact Many Families

Apple on Book

At the end of 2020, Congress passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act. Most of the attention around this act, a $2.3 trillion spending bill, was focused on the COVID-19 relief provisions. However, also buried in that massive document were dramatic changes to student financial aid rules.  These changes will go into effect during the 2023-2024 school year when the FAFSA becomes available on October 1, 2022.  Some of these changes are long overdue and will be a benefit to families.  However, not all changes will be beneficial.

First, here is a brief rundown on some of the changes you can expect in the future: 

The FAFSA will be shorter and easier to fill out

The FAFSA currently has over 100 questions included in the application and many of them are confusing.  The new simplified version will have approximately 36 questions.  It also allows applicants to have both their taxed and untaxed income transferred to the FAFSA automatically, as opposed to manually entering it or having to self-report it.

“Expected Family Contribution” will be renamed “Student Aid Index”

The Expected Family Contribution, or EFC, is an index that schools use to determine a family’s eligibility for financial aid.  The formula includes such things as a family’s income, non-retirement assets, marital status, number of dependents, and how many children will be attending college at the same time.  Theoretically, the lower the EFC, the more aid could be available to a family.  This will get renamed to Student Aid Index, or SAI, but will operate similar to the EFC so there will be no impact to families financially.

Change in Custodial Parent

Under the current rules, the custodial parent in two household families (as a result of divorce or separation for instance) is the parent whose financial information is supplied.  The custodial parent is defined as the parent with whom the child lives with for the majority of the year.  As of 2022, the parent who supplies the most financial support will be required to fill out the FAFSA application, and this may not necessarily be the custodial parent.  The result – a higher EFC and less financial aid available to the family.

Pell Grant Eligibility

Pell Grants are a form of need-based financial aid that are awarded to low-income students to help offset college costs.  These typically do not need to be repaid.  This change is one of the positives of the new legislation. Under the current method, Pell eligibility is determined by a family’s EFC, the cost of attendance at the chosen school, and whether the enrollment status is part time or full time.  With the new rules, the size of the student’s family and their adjusted gross income will determine their Pell eligibility and size of the award.  Families that make less than the 175% federal poverty level will receive the maximum award, which is $6,495.

The above summarizes some of the changes you can expect to see in the 2023-24 school year. Now let’s focus on one that will negatively impact many families.  Currently, financial aid eligibility increases for families with more than one student enrolled in college at the same time.  Under the new law, the aid eligible to families will significantly decrease.

Let me explain with a fictitious family that includes two children who are two years apart. The first child will be in college by himself for his freshman and sophomore year, but the younger child will start college when the older one begins his junior year.  Therefore, the family will have two kids in college at the same time for two years. Both parents work and their combined income is $150,000.  The family also has assets of $150,000 which include cash and savings, taxable investment assets, and 529 plans.   The calculated expected family contribution (EFC) for this family is $40,000.

Before we dive deeper into the above family’s college financial situation, I would like to explain how the EFC is utilized by schools.  Your EFC is an indexed number that college financial aid offices use to determine how much financial aid a family is eligible for.  The formula for financial need is the Cost of Attendance (COA) less the Expected Family Contribution (EFC).  For example, if your EFC is $30,000 and you are applying to a school that costs $70,000, you will be eligible for $40,000 of need based aid.  ($70,000 COA – $30,000 EFC = $40,000 need).  It is important to point out – just because you are eligible for $40,000 in need-based aid, it does not mean you will receive this from the school your child applied to.  All schools vary in the determination of financial aid, so this will be solely dependent on the individual institution.

Now back to our fictitious family.  Under current guidelines with two students in college at the same time, this family’s EFC would be cut roughly in half for each student.  When this family has only one child in college for the first two years, the EFC that the college will use is $40,000.  However, once the second child starts school, the EFC will be roughly be cut in half to $20,000 per student.  The total EFC does not change, but the distribution of it does.  Therefore, the school that the older child attends will factor in the following EFC numbers for the four years he/she is in college as $40,000, $40,000, $20,000 and $20,000 and adjust the need based financial aid package accordingly, with more aid from the school being distributed in the last two years.  End result: the family is still expected to pay a total of $40,000 annually.

Under the new bill, the EFC no longer will be reduced with multiple kids in college at the same time.  Therefore, the above family’s EFC contribution would be $40,000 in year one and two for the oldest child and then $40,000 per child for the next two years.  That reduction is eliminated and so is the additional need-based aid that would come with it.  This will significantly increase the financial strain on families with two children attending college simultaneously.

The Expected Family Contribution index was designed to give insight to colleges on what a family could afford to pay each year. For families who have, or will have, multiple children attending college at the same time, this new rule is a major setback. Instead of being more accommodating to families facing the rising cost of college, this new rule essentially doubles a family’s expected contribution, which would decrease the amount of aid they’re eligible for.  We encourage all families who will be adversely impacted by this change to consider writing your Congressman or Congresswoman and requesting action to repeal this part of the bill.