The Federal Reserve’s Toolkit + Market Hangover

Federal Reserve

The Federal Reserve’s toolkit consist of two blunt tools: the fed funds rate + quantitative easing. In this month’s contribution we’ll discuss the potential short and long-tail impacts of both.

On Wednesday (5/4/2022), in an effort to bring down rising inflation without disrupting economic activity, the Federal Reserve boosted interest rates by 50 basis points (.50%).

Like downing a Pedialyte following a three-day bender, the markets initially reacted positively. However, nausea quickly set in and the previous day gains were quickly reversed. By the end of the following trading day, ol’ S&P 500 and it’s tech pal Nasdaq were both sitting on the toilet holding trashcans, down 3.6% and 5% respectively. The single worst day for the market since June 2020.

In fact, last week marked the fifth consecutive weekly decline in the S&P 500, it’s longest losing streak since June 2011.

April CPI data released the following Wednesday (5/11/2022) showed another upward inflation surprise (above analyst expectations) and suggests that the deceleration is going to be painstakingly slow.

What’s going on?

In short: A lot.

  • Covid Supply & Demand Constraints: Domestically, although things are beginning to look better, the dust has still not settled from the logjams created by Covid. Internationally, China’s most recent bout of Covid-19 lockdowns has reduced the supply of Chinese exports and dampened demand for imports.
  • Oil Shock: Sanctions against Russia are forcing countries reliant on Russian oil to explore other energy suppliers/solutions which has driven up global oil prices.
  • Inflation: No matter how transitory the Fed believes inflation may be, they’re no longer sitting around and waiting for the situation to rectify itself. They are now deploying their limited arsenal of blunt tools to bring this down.

This last point re: inflation/Fed tools deserves some extra attention.

Federal Reserve: The Bartender

As already mentioned, the primary tools in the Federal Reserve’s toolkit are:

  1. controlling the federal funds rates (which impacts interest rates)
  2. quantitative easing (QE) which introduces new money into the money supply.

In another alcohol analogy, imagine the Fed as our bartender.

Interest rates:

If the bartender wanted to incentivize drinking (helllllllo happy hour!), the bartender could lower the prices which might increase consumption. The drink servers (banks) would let all the patrons (individuals/investors etc.) know that drink prices are down – get ‘em while you can! This is, in effect, what lowering the fed funds rate does for our economy – it lowers the cost of borrowing and incentivizes investment.

Conversely, perhaps the party is really hoppin’ and there’s a line around the corner to get in, the bartender might then increase drink prices (i.e. increase the fed funds rate) to slow down the debauchery (i.e. irrational exuberance).

 Quantitative Easing:

QE is the other strategy that the bartender (Fed) deploys to get a dreadfully boring party (i.e. crashing economy) poppin’ again.

In this scenario, you can only order drinks (i.e. do business) with the drink servers (banks). During happy hour, the bartender notices that the servers (banks) aren’t hawking drinks (lending), they have empty trays. To get them up and active again, the bartender loads up the drink trays (i.e. Fed buys long term securities from the open market) but lowers the amount of alcohol in each cup (i.e. the fed’s asset purchases increase the banks’ reserves which results in lowers yields + more money in circulation).

This action results in the drink servers (banks) being flush with heavy trays of drinks (excess reserves) and incentivized to get back out to doing business (lending).

Ugh, yes – monetary policy is nuanced and there are some obvious holes in these oversimplified analogies but hopefully this is kinda helpful?!

A Recent History of Fed Interventions

While the Fed has deployed it’s influence on interest rates by increasing/decreasing the federal funds rate in the past, this tool had traditionally been reserved to rein in inflation and/or unemployment.

However, beginning with Alan Greenspan following the 1987 stock market crash, Federal Reserve chairs began lowering interest rates for one additional reason besides controlling inflation/unemployment: to proactively halt excessive stock market declines. This “Greenspan Put,” as it became known, acted as a form of insurance against market losses.

Since then, the Fed has intervened with lowering interest rates on a number of occasions to minimize stock market volatility/losses: the savings and loan crisis, the Gulf War, Mexican peso crisis, Asian financial crisis, Long-Term Capital Management (LTCM) crisis, Y2K, dotcom bubble, and 2008 financial crisis.

Quantitative easing (QE), on the other hand, is a more recent monetary policy first deployed by Japan in 2001 to stymie the collapse of their financial market. In the US, QE was deployed following the 2008 crisis in three separate waves: in 2009, 2010, and 2012.

As mentioned earlier, QE is when central banks introduce new money into the money supply. In practice, this is done by central banks purchasing longer-term securities from the open market. This action drives up money supply and encourages institutions to keep lending (and investing!).

While it’s the Treasury that controls the printing of money, it’s the Federal Reserve that effectively decides how much money is created (in the form of actual paper money + credit).

What the Fed is doing now

Most recently, as global financial markets began nosediving due to Covid-19 lockdowns, the Federal Reserve stepped in with a broad array of actions to limit the damage.

First, they reduced the fed funds rate to ground zero (0.0%-0.25%) which brought the cost of borrowing to historic lows. They also pursued quantitative easing (QE) which included large purchases of U.S. government and mortgage-backed securities as well as lending to support households, employers, financial market participants, and state and local governments.

Through quantitative easing (QE), the Fed’s balance sheet has now swelled to nearly $9T (nearly double that following the ’08 financial crisis).

The Hangover

The combination of lower interest rates and $9T of QE is like a shot of adrenaline, or a Red Bull Vodka – it gives an immediate bump but a potentially painful come-down.

At wHealth Advisors, while we’re rationally optimistic that the long-term return potential in the stock market remains strong, there a number of hurdles facing the short/medium term:

  • Increasing National Deficit: The current national deficit is approaching $30T. The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act resulted in record corporate profits and strong stock market performance. However, the cuts essentially 1) borrowed economic growth from the future and 2) are expected to add $2-2.2T to the national deficit over the next six years. The 2017 tax cuts + QE response to Covid-19 have swelled the deficit and put the US on a “fiscally unsustainable” path, to quote the Government Accountability Office (GAO).
  • Tax Hikes Likely: There seems to be little interest in reducing federal expenditures. As such, without extreme austerity, the only other solution to combat rising deficits is increasing taxes (likely impacting both individual/corporate rates).
  • Slower Growth: Economists expect 2.3% GDP growth per year, on average, over the next 10 years, even after accounting for expectations of increased economic activity in the near term. This compares to historical average GDP growth of 3.1% per year since 1948.
  • Muted 10yr Equity Outlook: A lower economic outlook combined with record high equity valuations has many fund companies bracing investors for lower expected returns going forward. Vanguard forecasts US equities to have a 10yr annualized return between 2.0-4.0% and international equities to range between 5.1-7.1%.

 Final Thoughts:

The Fed’s QE actions, creating $9T more or less out of thin air, is somewhat uncharted territory. It will take time to fully understand the ramifications of this. For the time being, we’ve got inflation and a choppy stock market.

In the immediate future, the Fed has made clear that they are willing to increase unemployment to slow down inflation. To do this, the Fed is targeting a 2.25% fed funds rate and aiming to reduce their $9T balance sheet by $1T over next 12 months.

Over the short-medium term, continued stock market volatility will be inescapable. Actively reducing equity allocations in anticipation of, or in reaction to, fed funds rate increases is unlikely to lead to better investment outcomes.

Over the longer-term, investors who maintain a broadly diversified portfolio and use information in market prices to systematically focus on higher expected returns (i.e. exactly what we do for our clients at wHealth Advisors) should be better positioned for long-term investment success.

Resilient financial plans are designed with unpredictable, gloomy outlooks in mind. Please be in touch if you have any questions or concerns regarding your plan’s resiliency for the road ahead.

The SEC Finally Enforces ESG

SEC enforces ESG disclosure

With Earth Month upon us, we’re happy to report one small, incremental bit of progress in finance:

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) will finally enforce ESG disclosure and begin requiring public companies to share their greenhouse gas pollution and climate risks.

Pressure Has Mounted – The SEC Finally Enforces ESG Disclosure

Back in a 2019 blog post we wrote about our key takeaways from three finance-focused climate events we attended.

The events had confirmed our understanding that ESG investing – that is, investing in funds that claim to prioritize environmental, social, and governance (ESG) factors – was subjective and, at best, financial industry greenwashing.” 

Reason: Up until now, the SEC has not required public companies to disclose any ESG metrics. Without metrics, ESG fund managers were forced to make subjective judgement calls about their fund’s holdings (note: unless explicitly stated, ESG funds rarely divested from any specific companies or asset classes). Despite this reality, fund companies marketed these funds as fuzzy, feel-good environmentally-socially-conscious investment solutions.

At the time, the SEC defended it’s position by claiming that ESG metrics were nonmaterial to shareholders/investors.

Since then, and considering that there is now over $40 trillion in assets globally invested in ESG funds, there has been significant pushback from nearly all corners of the investment world. Individual and institutional investors, state pension funds, endowments, and even sovereign wealth funds have all pushed for more ESG disclosure.

Why Do Investors Want More ESG Disclosure?

One possible answer is, for the same reason they want good consistent financial disclosure: They want to be able to understand how companies work, so that they can buy the good ones and avoid the risky ones.

And most of the SEC’s proposal is about that sort of thing: Climate risks can affect a company’s business and financial results, so investors need to understand those risks to understand the business.

In other words, an about-face:

Emissions + climate risks = material information for shareholders/investors

Major Shift

This marks a major shift in how corporations must show they are dealing with climate change.

For the first time ever, the SEC finally enforces ESG and plans to require businesses to outline the risks a warming planet poses to their operations. In fact, some large companies will have to provide information on emissions they don’t make themselves, but come from other firms in their supply chain.

The rules will require companies to:

  • describe what climate-related risks they face and how they manage those risks
  • disclose, if applicable, a “transition plan” to adapt to a warming world, or whether they “use scenario analysis to assess the resilience of their business strategy to climate-related risks,”
  • disclose and quantify the use of carbon offsets
  • disclose how their financials are affected by climate risk

In essence, the SEC is proposing a complex accounting regime for ESG, a legally approved set of Generally Accepted Climate Principles, with its own body of technical standards and its own set of climate attestation professionals.

Takeaway:

While we’re optimistic that these new disclosure requirements will improve ESG investing, do note that it will take time. Implementation will take place between fiscal year 2023 and 2026 (depending on the size of company).

While increased disclosure of public companies is good, the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) latest climate report suggested that ESG investing “does not yield meaningful social or environmental outcomes.”

Instead, the report cited, in order to avert the increasingly likely scenario of catastrophic global warming, the world needs stronger government policy and enhanced regulation.

Happy Earth Month. 

How will you do your small part to honor Mother Earth this year?

Let us know!

 Federal Tax Proposal – A Summary

TAX

The Biden administration recently announced a number of tax proposals to fund new government investments. The current version may not be the final form, but many of its features are likely to become law. Below is a summary of what is most likely to impact families.

Income Tax Rates

  • Increase in the marginal tax rate: The top marginal tax rate would increase from 37% to 39.6% for income greater than $400,000 if you file as single and $450,000 if filed as married filing jointly (MFJ). These changes would go into effect for the 2022 tax year.

 

  • Increase in the top long-term capital gains rate: The highest marginal long-term capital gains rate would increase from 20% to 25% for incomes higher than $400,000 (single) or $450,000 (married filing jointly). The change in rate to 25% would be effective as of September 13, 2021 unless a sale was already under contract prior to that date.

 

  • S Corporations: Business profits from S corporations will be subject to a 3.8% surtax for taxpayers with Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) above $400,000 (single) and $500,000 (MFJ).

 

  • Section 199A QBI Deduction: To be phased out for those earning over $400,000 (single) or $500,000 (MFJ).

 

  • Additional 3% surtax on ultra-high income: An additional flat tax of 3% would be applied on any MAGI above $2,500,000 for individuals filing as married filing separately or above $5,000,000 for MFJ or single.

Retirement Strategies and Plans

  • Roth conversions will no longer be allowed for high income individuals:
    • New rules would prohibit all Roth conversions for taxpayers in the highest ordinary income tax bracket (39.6%) beginning January 1, 2032.
    • Roth conversions of after-tax funds will be prohibited for ALL taxpayers beginning January 1, 2022. This would eliminate backdoor Roth as a planning strategy.

 

  • Restricts contributions to IRAs or Roth IRAs for high net worth individuals if:
    • Taxable income is greater than $400,000 (single) or $450,000 (MFJ) AND the total value of IRA and defined contribution plans exceed $10,000,000.
    • The limitation does not apply to contributions of employer plans such as a 401(k), SEP IRA, or pension plan.

 

  • Change in Required Minimum Distributions (RMD) for individuals whose aggregate retirement account size exceeds $10,000,000:
    • Imposes RMDs on large retirement account balances if:
      • Taxable income is greater than $400,000 (single) or $450,000 (MFJ), AND
      • The total value of IRA and defined contribution plans exceed $10,000,000

 

  • If combined balance is between $10,000,000 and $20,000,000, the owner must distribute 50% of the amount of the account balances in excess of $10,000,000.
  • If the balance is greater than $20,000,000, the RMD would be 100% in excess of $20,000,000, plus 50% of any amount over $10,000,000.

Additional Changes

  • Wash Sale rule: This will be expanded to include cryptocurrency and other digital assets, commodities, and foreign currencies.

 

  • Estate Tax Exemption would be reduced: Would revert back to $5,850,000 per person and $11,700,000 per couple. This was scheduled to happen in 2026, but under the new proposal, it would get accelerated to 2022.

 

  • Increased child tax credit and monthly advance payment extended until 2025: Monthly advance payments of $250 per qualifying child aged 6-17 and $300 per child below the age of 6 would continue.

 

  • Assets held within grantor trusts may become part of taxable estate: This would potentially eliminate the benefit of certain estate planning techniques, namely Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts (ILITs).

This One Change to Financial Aid Could Negatively Impact Many Families

Apple on Book

At the end of 2020, Congress passed the Consolidated Appropriations Act. Most of the attention around this act, a $2.3 trillion spending bill, was focused on the COVID-19 relief provisions. However, also buried in that massive document were dramatic changes to student financial aid rules.  These changes will go into effect during the 2023-2024 school year when the FAFSA becomes available on October 1, 2022.  Some of these changes are long overdue and will be a benefit to families.  However, not all changes will be beneficial.

First, here is a brief rundown on some of the changes you can expect in the future: 

The FAFSA will be shorter and easier to fill out

The FAFSA currently has over 100 questions included in the application and many of them are confusing.  The new simplified version will have approximately 36 questions.  It also allows applicants to have both their taxed and untaxed income transferred to the FAFSA automatically, as opposed to manually entering it or having to self-report it.

“Expected Family Contribution” will be renamed “Student Aid Index”

The Expected Family Contribution, or EFC, is an index that schools use to determine a family’s eligibility for financial aid.  The formula includes such things as a family’s income, non-retirement assets, marital status, number of dependents, and how many children will be attending college at the same time.  Theoretically, the lower the EFC, the more aid could be available to a family.  This will get renamed to Student Aid Index, or SAI, but will operate similar to the EFC so there will be no impact to families financially.

Change in Custodial Parent

Under the current rules, the custodial parent in two household families (as a result of divorce or separation for instance) is the parent whose financial information is supplied.  The custodial parent is defined as the parent with whom the child lives with for the majority of the year.  As of 2022, the parent who supplies the most financial support will be required to fill out the FAFSA application, and this may not necessarily be the custodial parent.  The result – a higher EFC and less financial aid available to the family.

Pell Grant Eligibility

Pell Grants are a form of need-based financial aid that are awarded to low-income students to help offset college costs.  These typically do not need to be repaid.  This change is one of the positives of the new legislation. Under the current method, Pell eligibility is determined by a family’s EFC, the cost of attendance at the chosen school, and whether the enrollment status is part time or full time.  With the new rules, the size of the student’s family and their adjusted gross income will determine their Pell eligibility and size of the award.  Families that make less than the 175% federal poverty level will receive the maximum award, which is $6,495.

The above summarizes some of the changes you can expect to see in the 2023-24 school year. Now let’s focus on one that will negatively impact many families.  Currently, financial aid eligibility increases for families with more than one student enrolled in college at the same time.  Under the new law, the aid eligible to families will significantly decrease.

Let me explain with a fictitious family that includes two children who are two years apart. The first child will be in college by himself for his freshman and sophomore year, but the younger child will start college when the older one begins his junior year.  Therefore, the family will have two kids in college at the same time for two years. Both parents work and their combined income is $150,000.  The family also has assets of $150,000 which include cash and savings, taxable investment assets, and 529 plans.   The calculated expected family contribution (EFC) for this family is $40,000.

Before we dive deeper into the above family’s college financial situation, I would like to explain how the EFC is utilized by schools.  Your EFC is an indexed number that college financial aid offices use to determine how much financial aid a family is eligible for.  The formula for financial need is the Cost of Attendance (COA) less the Expected Family Contribution (EFC).  For example, if your EFC is $30,000 and you are applying to a school that costs $70,000, you will be eligible for $40,000 of need based aid.  ($70,000 COA – $30,000 EFC = $40,000 need).  It is important to point out – just because you are eligible for $40,000 in need-based aid, it does not mean you will receive this from the school your child applied to.  All schools vary in the determination of financial aid, so this will be solely dependent on the individual institution.

Now back to our fictitious family.  Under current guidelines with two students in college at the same time, this family’s EFC would be cut roughly in half for each student.  When this family has only one child in college for the first two years, the EFC that the college will use is $40,000.  However, once the second child starts school, the EFC will be roughly be cut in half to $20,000 per student.  The total EFC does not change, but the distribution of it does.  Therefore, the school that the older child attends will factor in the following EFC numbers for the four years he/she is in college as $40,000, $40,000, $20,000 and $20,000 and adjust the need based financial aid package accordingly, with more aid from the school being distributed in the last two years.  End result: the family is still expected to pay a total of $40,000 annually.

Under the new bill, the EFC no longer will be reduced with multiple kids in college at the same time.  Therefore, the above family’s EFC contribution would be $40,000 in year one and two for the oldest child and then $40,000 per child for the next two years.  That reduction is eliminated and so is the additional need-based aid that would come with it.  This will significantly increase the financial strain on families with two children attending college simultaneously.

The Expected Family Contribution index was designed to give insight to colleges on what a family could afford to pay each year. For families who have, or will have, multiple children attending college at the same time, this new rule is a major setback. Instead of being more accommodating to families facing the rising cost of college, this new rule essentially doubles a family’s expected contribution, which would decrease the amount of aid they’re eligible for.  We encourage all families who will be adversely impacted by this change to consider writing your Congressman or Congresswoman and requesting action to repeal this part of the bill.

Webinar: Financial Crash Course For DOCTORS

Medical Professionals

FINANCIAL CRASH COURSE FOR DOCTORS

wHealth Advisors is excited to announce a free webinar to help doctors (and those in training) get on a path towards financial independence.

Financial independence? Say what?

In a nutshell, financial independence means being financially secure enough that you continue working because you want to, not because you need to. Everyone’s situation is unique. Just as a good salary does not guarantee financial independence, mountains of student debt does not disqualify you.

For some, financial independence will mean making sacrifices. To others, it’s life as usual. In any case, it requires a vision, setting intentions, and having a roadmap that can evolve with you over time.

When: The Financial Crash Course for DOCTORS webinar will be given FOUR times (live) each Wednesday at 5pm (EDT) through the month of May. Seating is limited to 100 participants per webinar. We ask that you register using your work/school email – priority will be given to medical professionals.

What we’ll cover: Timely and timeless topics including:

  • COVID-19 Legislation: The impact on stimulus checks, student loans (including PSLF), and mortgages.
  • The NINE money mistakes doctors keep making
  • Fundamentals of Fiscal Fitness
  • Building a rock-solid financial foundation
  • The Juggle: Investing vs. student loan repayment
  • Physician mortgages: When they make sense (and when they don’t!)
  • Human capital: Investing in yourself

Why doctors? wHealth Advisors was founded on serving the medical community. While we can’t provide the resources they need most during this time (namely, PPE), we can offer what we know best: objective, evidenced-based financial guidance with no sales agenda or conflicts of interest.

The intended audience for this webinar includes those who are:

  • Medical/dental students
  • Interns/residents/fellows
  • Attendings or established docs that graduated medical/dental school within past 15 years

FIGS Giveaway: Following each webinar we will be randomly selecting a winner for a $25 FIGS gift card. Registering for the event is an automatic entry. Also – be sure to tag friends, classmates, and colleagues on our webinar-related Instagram posts (@whealthadvisors). More tags = more entries (limit = 10 total).

For any questions, please feel free to contact us at hello@whealthfa.com.

Follow links below to register on preferred date:

May 6, 2020 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

  • https://webinar.ringcentral.com/webinar/register/WN_eZ7hj5awSyaVwOqBejqDOg

May 13, 2020 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

  • https://webinar.ringcentral.com/webinar/register/WN_O2-njPcSQ_OeyH_H_57FJw

May 20, 2020 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

  • https://webinar.ringcentral.com/webinar/register/WN_tX3J4IHTSh6IyNEqVNZtRw

May 27, 2020 5:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

  • https://webinar.ringcentral.com/webinar/register/WN_FvLsh_flRRWpOf2GdV6SjQ

 

Terms & Conditions

Additional Resources:

Student Loans:

  • freestudentloanadvice.org: Great resource and created to ensure that all consumers have access to fair, free, student loan advice and dispute resolution.
  • nslds.ed.gov: National Student Loan Data System – best place to go when creating an inventory of your Federal loans.
  • www.annualcreditreport.com: Best place to go when creating an inventory of your private student loans.
  • Gradaway.com: Affordable student loan refinancing/consolidation company
    • $248 for balances < $100k
    • $349 for balances $100k – $250k
    • $449 for balances over $250k

Stimulus Checks:

NAPFA-Advisor-Checklist: NAPFA Checklist for interviewing Financial Advisors

Five Fundamentals of Fiscal Fitness

The SECURE Act: What you need to know

The SECURE Act

Written by: Dennis McNamara

Congress just passed a year-end bill known as the SECURE Act (i.e. Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019). While the name suggests both promise and opportunity in solving our nation’s retirement crisis, we at wHealth Advisors dug into the weeds and wanted to use our last blog post of 2019 to share some thoughts.

Let’s start with the GOOD:

  • Retirement deductions for those over 70.5 years old: For those who have earned income and happen to be over age 70.5, you can now contribute to an IRA.
  • Required minimum distributions bumped back from 70.5 to 72: For those who are not yet 72, required minimum distributions from qualified retirement accounts will now begin at 72 rather than 70.5.
  • Multiple Employer Retirement Plans: Allows two or more unrelated employers to join a pooled employer retirement plan (Dental and Medical practice owners/partners: This is for you!). These plans will need to be administered by a Registered Investment Advisor firm (like wHealth Advisors). If done correctly, this provision can create significant savings for both owners and participating employees.
  • Kiddie tax rates: Unearned income for a child under 18, or under 24 and a full-time student, to now be taxed at the parent’s marginal tax rate (as opposed to the previous trust tax rates which in most cases were higher than the parent’s tax rates).
  • 529 plan expansion of qualified expenses: Allows 529 funds to be used for registered apprenticeships, home/private/religious schooling, and up to $10,000 of qualified student loan repayments.

And now the BAD:

  • No more “stretch IRAs” for inherited retirement accounts: Before the SECURE Act, if you passed away and left a qualified retirement plan to your descendants (think: 401k, IRA, 403b etc.), the beneficiaries could take distributions from the inherited account over their own personal life expectancy (calculated by IRS). For example, suppose a 30 year old inherited an IRA from their parent. That 30 year old was previously able to take annual, piecemeal distributions and “stretch” the distributions from the qualified account until their death. After the SECURE Act, non-spouse inheritors of qualified retirement accounts must now have the funds distributed within 10 years of inheriting (note: this change begins for accounts inherited in 2020).
    • This is extremely detrimental to the average investor. REASON: Forces larger income distributions to beneficiaries even if the income is not needed. This will not only minimize the tax deferral benefits (having to take the money sooner prevents the funds from having a longer time horizon to grow tax free) but will also trigger many investors to be bumped into higher tax brackets. From a behavioral standpoint, forcing distributions over a 10 year period will likely result in more folks squandering inherited retirement accounts (thus giving annuity reps another mouth-watering opportunity to sell annuity products).
  • Employer retirement plans can offer “Lifetime Income Providers”: TRANSLATION – annuity companies and their advisors can now place more of their high-cost annuity products into employer retirement plans. Additionally, and according to the SECURE Act, there is no requirement for a fiduciary to select the least expensive option.

OTHER provisions worth noting:

  • In 2021 the IRS will make slight tweaks to it’s life expectancy tables (which will impact required minimum distributions). A small change but a positive one.
  • Increased tax credit for employers starting a retirement plan and for employers that setup a plan with auto-enrollment (again, a nice perk for the Dental/Medical practice owners!).
  • Penalty-free withdrawal (up to $5k) from retirement plans for individuals in case of birth of a child or adoption.
  • Federal medical expense deduction reduced to 7.5% of AGI (down from 10%).

As is often the case, what legislation gives with one hand it takes with the other. While we’re happy with some of the improvements, the most impactful changes (elimination of stretch IRAs, annuities in 401k plans) make it clear that the real winner of the SECURE Act is the insurance lobby.

For any questions or clarifications please feel free to contact us hello@whealthfa.com.